The Global eBook Market

In 2010, the global ebook market grew by more than 200 percent. e-Readers are in-part responsible for spurring the growth of digital books.

e-Reader ownership nearly tripled in 2010. By December 2010, eight percent of the population of the United States owned e-readers. Experts predict that that figure will grow to 13 to 15 percent of the population this year.

Currently, the United States represents more than 80 percent of the global ebook sales. Surprisingly, Western Europe accounted for only 10 percent of global sales, and this was mostly dominated by the United Kingdom market.

Experts predict that by 2014, the United States will only be 50 percent of the global ebook market, as the rest of the world begins to embrace digital books.

I think this is good news for publishers. As the ebook market grows around the world, the reach of your products into other English-speaking countries can grow.

For example, India’s national language is English. There are over one billion people living in India. Many of them speak and read English.  As the Indian economy grows, so does its appetite for books. India currently has one of the fastest growing markets in the world for English-language titles.

With the growth of digital books, publishers will no longer have to seek out foreign distributors to get your books into the hands of English-speaking people around the world. Now, all that can be done from the comfort of your office via retail ebook websites, leading to a growth in your book sales.

Many of you probably already have your books listed on Flipkart.com, the large online Indian bookstore. (Interestingly, the founders of Flipkart worked for Amazon.com before starting this business in India.) It is only a matter of time before sites like this around the world will begin to include ebooks.

I believe that in just a few years, simply having your ebooks in the right distribution channels here in the United States will ensure world-wide exposure to English-speaking individuals.

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