Are You Outdated?

Have you heard the saying, “Dress for the job you want, not the job you have”?

Dressing for the job you want over the one you have is about impression. It is giving the appearance that you are capable of handling that job. Your clothing makes a statement about who you are and where you want to go.

Authors don’t necessarily need to dress for the job they want. Instead, they need to stay up-to-date on industry standards to give the impression that their writing is exemplary. Just as clothes are important in making an impression at a job, conforming to industry standards is necessary for authors’ success.

outdated

Staying up-to-date on industry standards is essential for independently published authors to be successful. For example:

  • If you are an aspiring author and you send a complete manuscript via snail mail to a publishing house that only accepts book proposals and chapter excerpts via email, you will not make a favorable impression with the editors. As a result, you will not secure a publishing contract.
  • If you are a published author and you send a press release that does not conform to industry standards, you will not make a favorable impression with the media. As a result, you will lose out on media coverage.
  • If you are an independently published author and you don’t provide the appropriate metadata for your online book listings, you will not make a favorable impression with readers. As a result, you will lose out on sales.

I am surprised at the number of authors nominating a book for the Christian Small Publisher Book of the Year Award who provide a 10-digit ISBN number instead of a 13-digit ISBN number with their nomination. The 13-digit ISBN number has been industry standard since January 1, 2007. All books published on or after January 1, 2007, must carry the 13-digit ISBN number on the book.

Yes, Amazon.com lists both the 10-digit ISBN and the 13-digit ISBN number. Amazon does this because they list books published prior to January 1, 2007, that carry the old 10-digit ISBN number. However, when someone asks for the ISBN number of a book published since January 1, 2007, the author should give the 13-digit ISBN number. This is industry standard.

Staying abreast of industry standards can be time-consuming, especially when an author wants to focus on writing, publishing, and promoting books. The good news is that you don’t have to take on that task alone—this is what author and publisher associations help with.

One of the benefits of belonging to a publishing association like Christian Small Publishers Association (CSPA) is that the association provides you the information you need to stay abreast of industry standards so that you can be more successful.

If you want help on making sure that you are up-to-date in publishing and marketing your books, you can join Christian Small Publishers Association (CSPA) for the 2017 calendar year today! Simply fill out the application on our website at www.christianpublishers.net.

Related Posts:
Are You Up-to-Date?
Is that Information Necessary?
10 Reasons to Enter a Book Award

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2 thoughts on “Are You Outdated?

  1. Correction – the books that have only a 10 digit ISBN are using numbers called ASIN. These are for books that are digital only versions. I have four digital only books out with Amazon, and to get the longer, 13 digit ISBN I had to publish on Kobo or with another retailer. (None of my books are set up for hard copy printing, but some advertisers require the 13 digit ISBN.) Also, thank you for the reminder we need to stay up on trends.

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  2. I think you are confused about 10-Digit ISBN numbers and ASIN numbers (which also happen to be 10-digits). ASIN numbers are completely different from 10-digit ISBN numbers. 10-digit ISBN numbers only have numbers, although some may have a terminal x. ASIN numbers have letters like this: B00KGOEA38. I don’t think any listing on Amazon carries just a 10-digit ISBN. They always list both the 10 and 13. The reason the 10 is still included by Amazon in their listing is because books that were published prior to the introduction of the 13-digit ISBN only carry the old 10-digit on the physical copy. 10-digit ISBN numbers are no longer assigned by Bowker, but you can convert a new 13-digit ISBN to show what the old 10-digit would have looked like.

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