Amazon’s “Buy Button” Policy

The publishing world is all abuzz with the latest Amazon change. It has to do with Amazon’s “Buy Button” policy change in regards to new books sold on the site.

A Little History

Last November, Amazon began allowed third-party book re-sellers to “win” buy buttons on book pages. Third-party re-sellers on Amazon can win a buy button by meeting various criteria outlined by Amazon, which includes price, availability, and delivery time (see https://goo.gl/11yc37).

The program is only open to new books, defined by Amazon as “brand-new, unused, unread copy in perfect condition. The dust cover and original protective wrapping, if any, is intact. All supplementary materials are included and all access codes for electronic material, if applicable, are valid and/or in working condition.”

Amazon has long allowed third-party sellers to compete with Amazon for the sale of new items. Up until last year, books were exempt from this program with Amazon selling the publisher’s copy of a book as the first listed seller. Interestingly, Amazon currently does not sell or stream copies of other copyrighted works—movies and television programs—that are distributed by anyone other than the authorized distributor. In other words, third party sellers cannot sell these copyrighted new works.

The Concern

Of course, publishers are concerned that they will not get their fair share of retail price for new books sold by third-party sellers on Amazon. Where do these third-party sellers get their books? Generally, not from the publishers. Publishers and authors make the most money from books sold directly through Amazon because these books are purchased directly from them (although sometimes through the publisher’s distributor).

Many authors and publishers have also expressed concern that the books being listed as “new” by third-party sellers are not really “new”. If you believe your book (or anyone’s book) is being sold as “new” by a third-party seller—but really isn’t a new book—you can file a complaint with Amazon (see https://goo.gl/aqfw5P).

Speculation

Anytime Amazon makes a major policy change, many speculate as to the motivation behind the move. Two theories are being kicked around.

  1. Amazon is trying to expand its POD offering and wants to encourage publishers and authors to use its POD services. After all, it appears that, for the most part, books sold via Createspace and IngramSpark still have Amazon as the primary “buy” button.
  2. The other speculated motivation is that Amazon wants to reduce their storage and labor costs by giving preference to third-party buyers. In doing so, Amazon will have less books to stock and move in their warehouses.

Personally, I also wonder how much Amazon just changes things up every so often to stay in the news. Every change brings lots of buzz, so the strategy seems to work if that is what they are after.

As a consumer who buys books on Amazon, I find the third-party buy button very annoying. It makes me have to double and triple check that I am actually buying the book from Amazon and not a third-party seller that will make me pay shipping.

I would love to hear if and how Amazon’s buy button policy has effected your book listing and sales on the site.

Related Posts:
Amazon is Still King
Amazon is Not a Distributor
Amazon: Christian Authors Beware

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Are You Playing by the Rules?

“If you are going to play the game, you have to play by the rules.”

This statement is not just true of games. You have to play by the rules to drive a car, to pass a class, to acquire and keep a job, and to purchase a house. The same is true for publishing a book. You need to play by the rules.

In publishing, the rules are referred to as industry standards. There are some basic industry standards that all major publishers follow. These standards allow for an ease of flow for books through the purchasing chain (think distribution, retailers, librarians, and consumers).

Sure, anyone can publish a book and sell it from their own website whether the book conforms to industry standards or not. But, if you are serious about publishing a professional looking book that consumers will purchase and read, that reviewers will review, and that retailers and libraries will stock, your book must play by the rules.
A number of independently published authors are so eager to get their book into print that they don’t take the time to learn to play by the rules. As a result, their books don’t conform to industry standards.

I meet authors who want to acquire media interviews, sell their books to retailers and showcase them at tradeshows, but their books lack ISBN numbers, EAN barcodes, BISAC codes, retail price, etc. One doesn’t go to a wedding dressed in a swimsuit, nor should your book enter the industry in pajamas.

In today’s information age, the information you need to play by the rules in publishing a book is available. One great resource for authors and publishers is publishing associations. Such associations help their members stay up-to-date with industry standards in both publishing and marketing books.

Through providing information and tools such as newsletters, webinars, and other avenues, a publishing association can help you get the resources you need to publish professionally. In addition to information, publishing associations also offer discounts on various products and services that authors and publishers use in producing books.

Christian Small Publishers Association (CSPA) is specifically geared toward providing information and cost-saving benefits to those authors and publishers who produce Christian materials. One great benefit of being a member of CSPA is free title uploads to IngramSpark and Lightning Source—a great cost saving benefit.

If you are producing Christian materials and want to play by the rules and publish professionally, I encourage you to join Christian Small Publishers Association (CSPA). The association is currently offering a fantastic summer special. Just $120 will pay your membership through December 2018. That is 18-months of membership at less than $7 per month. You can join today at http://www.christianpublishers.net/membership/become-a-member/.

Playing by the rules will get you farther then making up your own rules. Conform to industry standards and your book will see greater success.

Related Posts:
You Get What You Pay For
Is Your Message Distilled?
Are You Willing to Commit?

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Photo courtesy of Markus Spiske.

The 2017 Book of the Year Award Winners

The votes are in and counted. The winners of the 2017 Christian Small Publisher Book of the Year Award have been determined!

Christian book lovers and retailers voted on 120 nominated titles in 13 categories. The winners in each of the 13 categories are:

Fiction
Always With You, Elaine Stock, Elk Lake Publishing

Historical Fiction
Dawn of Liberty: Short Story Collection, Amber Schamel, Vision Writer Publications

Romance
Forgiveness, Marianne Evans, Pelican Book Group

Christian Living
Frankly Speaking, Janet Dash-Harris, CLM Publishing

Bible Study / Theology
Stuff Jesus Never Said, Paul Ellis, KingsPress

Devotional
Getting To Know Jesus: An Invitation to Walk With The Lord Day By Day, Eric Kampmann, Beaufort Books

Biography / Memoir
The Party’s Not Over Until God Says So, V.Lynn Whitfield, Professional Woman Publishing

Relationships / Family
Handing Out Life: The Simple Way to Rewarding Relationships in All of Life, Rev. Dr. Todd A. Biermann, Halo Publishing

Children’s (age 4 to 8)
Fireflies, Ginger Sanders (author), Tracy Applewhite Broom (illustrator)

Children’s (age 8 to 12)
Paul the Apostle: A Graphic Novel, Ben Avery (author), Mark Harmon (illustrator), Beartruth Collective, LLC

Young Adult (age 12+)
Healing Rain, Katy Newton Naas, Clean Reads

Gift Book
Jesus Loves You, Christine Topjian, Lighthouse Publishing

Christian Education
Examine Your Faith! Finding Truth in a World of Lies, Pamela Christian, Protocol, Ltd

Congratulations to the winners! Thank you to everyone who voted!

The Christian Small Publisher Book of the Year Award is sponsored by Christian Small Publishers Association (CSPA).

Looking for a great book to read next? Try one of the winners of the CSP Book of the Year Award listed here.

Related Posts:
The 2016 Book of the Year Award Winners
The 2015 Book of the Year Award Winners
The 2014 Book of the Year Award Winners

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You Get What You Pay For

You get what you pay for”—so the saying goes.

While there are a few exceptions, this statement is generally true, especially for what you get for free.

What is offered for free is never top-of-the-line. Free products are usually samples. They are a taste of what the full model offers. When a full model product is offered for free, it is usually an older model—the one that has already been replaced by a newer, better version.

The same principle holds true for free information. Free information posted on the Internet is not the premium stuff. Don’t get me wrong, this free information can be useful, but the providers usually save the best information for their books or services.

I provide a lot of free information on this blog. It is good valuable information, if a little basic, but it’s only a drop in the bucket. I provide the most valuable information in my book (Your Guide to Marketing Books in the Christian Marketplace), my on-demand webinars (MCB University), CSPA’s monthly newsletter (the CSPA Circular) for Members of the organization, and my workshops at writers’ conferences (see the upcoming seminars at the Colorado Christian Writers Conference and the Greater Philadelphia Christian Writers Conference).

Independent authors who think that everything they need to be successful is available online are operating under a false assumption. Free will only take you so far. The truth is that with online research:

  1. You won’t find all the valuable information in any reference or resource book on publishing or marketing.
  2. You won’t find the information all in one place. You will have to spend a lot of time researching.
  3. Some of the advice on the internet is bad advice. Listening to bad advice can cost you money.

Spending some money to purchase a book, membership, or conference attendance where you will hear from experts will save you time and money in the long run. Additionally, you can be confident that the information comes from reputable experts.

I run into a lot of newly published independent authors who are operating under many false assumptions and information, which causes them to flounder. Take the time to find and purchase the valuable information you need. It’s worth the investment.

If you are planning on publishing a book or have already published a book and need information on how the Christian marketplace works and how to effectively promote your book, I suggest you invest in one or more of the resources listed in this post.

Related Posts:
Getting What You Paid For?
Are You Asking?
Pay with a Tweet

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Photo courtesy of Timothy Muza

Sales of Indie Books Continue to Grow

Independent publishing (aka self-publishing) is here to stay. The number of books produced and sold by independent authors continues to grow. I think this is great news!

good-news

Data Guy over at Author Earnings shared some great new book sales statistics at the recent Digital Book World 2017. Here are a few of the interesting findings he shared in regards to independently published book sales for 2016 in the United States:

  • The total number of books units sold (both traditional and nontraditional in print, ebook, and audiobook formats) was 1,337,138,000.
  • The total number of independently published book units sold was 229,000,000 (counting ebook, audiobook, and print book sales).
  • Self-published titles accounted for 17% of total book sales.
    • About 30% of adult fiction and 10% of adult nonfiction book sales were independently published books.
  • Readers are buying books online: 69% of all book sales were made online.
    • About 72% of adult nonfiction books and 77% of adult fiction books were purchased online.

Independent publishing has truly come of age. I think that the industry overall is finally getting on board with accepting self-published titles.

books-sold

For years, most Christian writers’ conferences have been geared toward helping authors obtain traditional publishing contracts. This too is changing. Now some conferences are teaching attendees how to independently publish their books.

The Colorado Christian Writers Conference is offering this to their attendees. I will be teaching an intensive continuing education seminar at this conference in May on “You Can Indie Publish and Market Your Book”. This five-session seminar will cover the following topics:

  1. Three Things to Do Before You Publish Your Book
  2. Preparing Your Manuscript for Publishing
  3. DIY: Publish Your Book
  4. Obtaining Book Reviews
  5. Marketing: The Essential Ingredient

If you are thinking about independently publishing or know someone who is, sign up to attend the Colorado Christian Writers Conference and join me for this intensive training.

If you want to attend, but can’t make this conference, I will be teaching this seminar again at the Philadelphia Christian Writers Conference this summer in July.

Related Posts:
Independent Publishing Continues to Grow
Four Publishing Trends for 2017
A Little Yeast and Self-Publishing

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Photo courtesy of Hope House Press