Headlines Are More Important Than You Think

Advertising tycoon David Ogilvy once said:

On the average, five times as many people read the headline as read the body copy. When you have written your headline, you have spent eighty cents out of your dollar.

Ogilvy was referring to advertising headlines in his quote. However, his idea stands true for all types of headlines including:

  • Book Titles
  • Article Titles
  • Blog Post Titles
  • Email Subject Lines
  • Advertising Copy Headers

Each of these headlines are important for drawing the reader in. Brian Clark, the founder of Copyblogger says that 80% of people will read your headline copy, but only 20% will read the rest.

Additionally, studies show that:

  • One-third (33%) of email recipients open email based on the subject line alone.
  • The average click-through-rates on Facebook ads is less than 1%.

In other words, your headlines must be compelling enough to make people want to read more, whether that is your book’s title, your email subject line, or your blog post title. Your headline is either going to draw a reader in or it is going to send them looking for something else.

Your headline is like a fishing hook

Think of your headline as a fishing hook with bait. You want the bait to be attractive and tasty enough for the fish to take a bite. When crafting a headline consider using one or more of these morsels:

  • Fear of Missing Out
  • Curiosity
  • Funny
  • Pain Point
  • Emotional
  • Personal
  • Straightforward
  • Numbers

There are numerous tools online that help you generate great title ideas. There are also tools that analyze how effective your title will be at engaging readers.

You can generate better headlines with these tools:

You can analyze the effectiveness of your chosen title with these tools:

Your headlines require more creativity and thought than all the rest of your writing. If you want reader engagement, don’t skimp on your headlines. Craft a great headline and readers will follow.

Related Posts:
Grab More Attention With Your Titles
How to Get More Attention for Your Books
Are You Convincing Enough People?

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Photo courtesy of The Lazy Artist Gallery.

Grab More Attention With Your Titles

We are drowning in a sea of information. Experts estimate that the average American citizen sees anywhere from 3,000 to 20,000 marketing messages a day. Whether that figure is the lower end number or the higher end number, the truth is, standing out is difficult. You have to do something creative or different to grab people’s attention.

headlines

Whether you are writing the title of your next book, the title of a blog post or article, or the headlines on your website, writing catchy phrases is important. It can help grab reader’s attention in a sea of information and make them stop for a moment to read your information or learn more.

One popular website that posts articles daily makes their writers craft 25 titles for every article. You read that right: 25 headlines. One of the reasons that this website is so popular is that they are using headlines that are creative and attract attention. When an author is forced to write multiple headlines or titles, the creative juices start flowing. Then, a creative, catchy title can be picked from the list.

To be honest, I don’t write 25 titles for each of my blog posts. I probably should, but I don’t. I usually write about five. Here are the five I came up with for this post:

  • Grab More Attention with Your Titles
  • Headlines: Your Chance to Engage Consumers
  • Is It Catchy?
  • Stand Out From the Crowd with Your Titles
  • Write Effective Headlines and Titles

I wish that I had written more working titles for my book Your Guide to Marketing Books in the Christian Marketplace. Now that this book has been around almost 10 years (there are three editions), I think the title is too long. I could have developed a better title if I had forced myself to write 25 working titles to choose from. I confess. I didn’t. I only wrote about six.

Whether you are crafting a headline for a blog post, a website, an article, or a title for your next book, I encourage you to brainstorm multiple headlines. Headlines and titles are your first and most important chance to engage readers. Make yours stand out from the crowd.

You can also try out this handy little tool that rates headlines and titles for their effectiveness. This analyzer not only gives you a rating, it gives ideas for improving your title. The Headline Analyzer can be found at CoSchedule.

I ran the title for this blog post through the Headline Analyzer. In doing so, I learned that headlines that contain about six words tend to earn the highest number of click-throughs.

I am curious. Did the title of this blog post draw you in?

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Distinction
Becoming a Published Author
Call to Action

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