Is Your Text Causing Cognitive Overload?

I have a confession. I know that podcasts are extremely popular. However, I have not been able to bring myself to jump on board.

I rarely listen to podcasts. I am a very busy person (as are many Americans). In my opinion, podcasts just take too long to serve the “meat.”

Is your text causing cognitive overload?

If I want information on a topic, I find reading easier. With reading, I can scan an article or web page and find the important information I am looking for. With a podcast, I am locked in to listening until the meat is finally dished out—which is usually most of the way through the podcast.

I am not alone in scanning or skimming when reading to find information. Research shows that 79% of people scan a web page, while only 16% read word-for-word. Interestingly, another study found that people scan email newsletters similar to web pages.

Too much information results in cognitive overload. Today, we have more information in front of us than ever before in the history of the world. As a result, we can easily become overloaded with information, causing our brain to not work as efficiently.

In an effort to reduce our cognitive load, we scan information. This results in more efficient processing of that information by the brain.

Is your text scannable?

Reading a book is different from reading web copy, marketing copy, or emails. When people choose to read a book, they are making the choice to read word-for-word. When people seek specific information, they scan to find what they are looking for.

To engage more people, it is important that all your marketing material can be scanned easily so that your important points stand out. Marketing material includes:

  • Blog posts
  • Website copy
  • Book descriptions
  • Book back cover copy
  • Author bios
  • Online and print advertisements
  • Author media sheets

Text becomes more scannable when it is broken up. In your marketing text, don’t use big blocks of text like you do in a book. Instead, focus on breaking up the text as follows:

  • Use headings and subheadings.
  • Pull out points and make them a bullet list.
  • Keep your paragraphs short.
  • Highlight keywords.
  • Put your most important point first.

A good rule of thumb is that your marketing materials should contain half the word count (or less) then when writing conventionally.

Armed with this information, I suggest that you revisit your marketing material to ensure that it is not causing cognitive overload.

Related Posts:
Two Strategies for Creating Effective Marketing Messages
Sales Text that Sells
Are You Selling or Connecting?

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Photo courtesy of Silviarita and Geralt.

Marketing Tips for Live Streaming

In my recent article, Five Trends Authors Should Know for 2018, one trend I mention is that video dominates engagement on the Internet. Authors who want the most engagement with fans should consider using video in their marketing strategies.

Live streaming video is growing in popularity. Check out this great infographic that provides great marketing tips for live streaming on social media.

Related Posts:
Should You Use Live-Stream Video?
Using Videos to Promote Your Book
Creating a Book Video Trailer

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The Most Important Marketing Tip

Dave Sheets, Vice President at Snowfall Press, did a brief interview with me at the International Christian Retail Show (ICRS) this summer in Orlando. Dave asked me to talk about the most important marketing tip I have to share with small publishers.

If you want to know what I said, watch this brief interview.

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