Are You Doing This with Your Website?

Do you know what the top mission of your website is?

If you answered: To sell my books. You are wrong.

The most important duty of your website is to develop trust with your website visitors. First-time visitors make up 60 to 70 percent of traffic every month for the average website. When these new people reach your website, your job is to introduce them to you and your books. But, more importantly, you must build trust with these visitors. Trust is required for a sale to happen.

To develop trust with your website visitors, make sure that you are providing these four things on your website.

1. Relevant Content

If the majority of the daily visitors to your website are brand new, they are most likely unfamiliar with you and your books. Your primary job is to build trust with these people through information. Providing content that answers their questions and informs and educates them helps you build trust. When website visitors scan your information—and they do scan—and find valuable advice that is relevant to their situation, they begin to trust you and your message.

2. Free Samples

Be open with what you provide in your books. Studies show that providing samples improves sales. If people are confident that they will like what they are spending their money on, they are more likely to purchase. In some cases, offering a sample can boost sales by 2,000 percent. A sample raises people’s confidence. Offer one to a few chapters of your books so that people can sample what you have published to increase their trust and confidence in you.

3. Testimonials

Social proof increases consumers’ trust in a brand or product. Social proof is the construct that persuasion of an idea or behavior for an individual is linked with how others are responding to it. In essence, social proof reduces the perception of risk associated with a purchase. Testimonials are one form of social proof. They tell potential customers that others are benefiting from your books, increasing customers’ trust in you and your books.

4. Friendly, Prompt Support

If you sell books directly from your website, provide a way for people to contact you. From time to time, as Director of Christian Small Publishers Association (CSPA), I receive calls from people who are trying to reach a Member of CSPA. These people tell me that they have tried to purchase a book, or made a purchase, or have an issue with their purchase, yet are unable to get a hold of the publisher or author. They have called me to obtain help in this matter.

One recent study by Corra found that 52.4% of shoppers prefer to communicate through live chat on a website, while 32.8% preferred email for communicating, and 14.5% choose a phone call. If you are not providing live chat on your website, at least make sure that you provide a telephone number and an email. Then, be sure to check your emails and phone messages regularly so that you don’t leave customers or potential customers languishing. Prompt responses help to build trust.

Related Posts:
Can I Trust You?
Why Would Someone Buy Your Book?
First Impressions Matter

Don’t miss out on any of the great information shared in this blog. Subscribe to receive each post in your email box. Just click here.

But, Can You Sell It?

“My story is perfect just the way it is.”

These words were spoken to me by an aspiring author. I was meeting with this lady on the request of a friend. This aspiring author had penned a lovely rhyming story for children aged three to six. She was seeking feedback and direction.

At the start of our meeting, the author informed me that she thought she should find herself a literary agent for the book. She asked me how she would go about finding one.
I let her know that I could give her information on finding a literary agent, but I could also save her some time by giving her some feedback on her story that would help her in securing the services of a literary agent. This is when she made the statement that her story was perfect.

I attempted to explain to this aspiring author, that while her story might be wonderful, a literary agent and a publisher look at potential books from a number of angles. One important thing they always consider is the sellability of a book. In other words, literary agents and publishers evaluate first and foremost whether people will buy the story or topic in the format presented.

To begin with, this author’s story was 1,600 words in length. I explained to her that this length was much too long for a picture book for her target age group. Therefore, for a literary agent to be willing to represent it, she would need to cut the story length.

This author then suggested that instead of one book, she would make it into a series of seven books. Again, I talked about the ability to sell a book. Selling one picture book is much easier than selling a set of seven picture books. Parents are more likely to invest in one book than in a set of seven.

Stuck on her original idea, this lady really did not want to change her story. Hence, she began to have the same thought as many authors: “Maybe I should just publish it myself.”

The truth of the matter is, sellability matters whether you publish a book yourself or someone else publishes the book.

Readers have expectations. They have expectations about how a picture book should read for their child’s age. They have expectations about the flow of a story. They have expectations about the layout of a book. A book needs to meet these expectations to sell well.

If you are publishing a book, ask yourself: Can I sell it? Will people buy it?

The answer to this makes all the difference.

Related Posts:
The Key to Selling Books
Selling Thousands of Books
Selling Books in an Overcrowded Market

Don’t miss out on any of the great information shared in this blog. Subscribe to receive each post in your email box. Just click here.

Are You Following the Five-Hour Rule?

Many an Indie author has lamented to me that they can’t do all the marketing tasks that full-time, best-selling authors do to promote their books. The simply do not have the time.

These Indie authors work a full-time job and then write and publish their books in the hours that they are not devoting to their job or family. Most feel pinched for time.

One of my suggestions to these authors is to implement the five-hour rule into their marketing plan. I suggest that they set aside an hour each work day (before or after work) to engage in marketing activities for their books.

Can five hours a week really make a difference?

I believe it can and so does Michael Simmons, co-founder of Empact, and the man who coined the five-hour rule.

Michael Simmons came up with the term after learning that, throughout Benjamin Franklin’s adult life, he consistently invested roughly an hour a day to learning.

Benjamin Franklin had to leave formal schooling at age 10 to become an apprentice to his father. Hence, most of his learning came through reading books.

Michael Simmons realized that the most successful people were the ones most likely to devote time to reading. After looking at other successful people like Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, and Elon Musk who consistently read a book a week, Michael Simmons concluded:

“No matter how busy successful people are, they set aside at least an hour a day (or five hours a week) over their entire career for activities that can be classified as deliberate practice or learning.”

Similar to setting aside an hour a day to read and increase your knowledge, you can take just five hours a week and apply it to marketing activities.

Just like the five-hour rule reflects the very simple idea that, over time, the smartest and most successful people are the ones who are consistent and deliberate learners. So too, the most successful Indie authors are those that consistently and deliberately market their books.

One of the things I like about the five-hour rule is that it is manageable. Everyone can carve out an hour from their day to read a book or conduct deliberate marketing tasks.

I challenge you to apply the five-hour rule to your life for the next month and watch the difference it makes.

Related Posts:
What Are You Learning?
Are You Practicing These Habits of Success?
Are You Showing Up?

Don’t miss out on any of the great information shared in this blog. Subscribe to receive each post in your email box. Just click here.

How to Capture Attention from the Beginning

Attention spans are shrinking! In this era of multi-tasking, our attention to any one particular activity is getting shorter. One British study found:

  • The average British person has an average attention span of just 14 minutes.
  • While watching television the average adult loses concentration—usually to look at a mobile device—after just seven minutes.
  • A good book keeps the average adult’s full concentration for 15 minutes.

Eight seconds! Studies show that this is the amount of time you have to engage people online with your content.

We live in a world where people read more headlines than they do articles. As a result, grabbing your readers’ attention with your headline and your first few sentences are more important than ever.

Any content you create—a book, an article, a blog post, a newsletter, a podcast, a video—needs to capture people’s attention from the beginning. Strong starts are not only important in a book, they are important in any content that you create. A strong start draws people in by seizing their attention so that they want to read, hear, or view more.

With so little time to snag someone’s attention, a strong beginning is extremely important. You can use the following five ideas to hook people into staying for more in your next piece of content.

A quote
An interesting quote that creates an emotional connection, especially from a famous person, is a good hook. An emotional pull will keep your reader engaged.

A question
Draw your reader in and create intrigue with a question that resonates with your target audience. The reader will stay engaged to get the answer to the question.

A surprising statistic
A statistic that startles your reader grabs and holds attention. It is a great way to keep your audience reading to learn more.

A controversial statement
Nothing grabs attention like controversy. That’s why the media tends to highlight contentions. You can hook readers with an opening statement that is controversial and emotional for your readers.

An anecdote
People relate to stories. Sharing a short and amusing or interesting story about a real incident in your life or someone else’s life connects the reader to the material you are sharing. People love to read about life-changing moments or moments that create an “aha” experience where clarity is gained. Funny or embarrassing stories also draw readers in.

Related Posts:
How to Get More Attention for Your Books
Are You Paying Attention?
Five Tips for Staying Focused

Don’t miss out on any of the great information shared in this blog. Subscribe to receive each post in your email box. Just click here.

Photo courtesy of Olivia Spink.

Do You Need Marketing Confidence?

You have heard the clichés “Dress for success” and “Dress for the job you want, not the job you have.” While familiar and maybe a little overused, they are still true.

Similar to dressing for success, there are steps that you can take to build your confidence for success in marketing your books. If you find yourself lacking marketing confidence, implement these three suggestions that will boost your confidence the way dressing does.

1. Present a Professional Image.

A professional image is about dressing sharply. As an author, your website, business card, letterhead, email signature, and social networking sites are where your audience receives their first impression of you. Make sure these look sharp and professional. Use a professional author photo. Have consistency across all your platforms in image, color, and theme so that you present a branded image.

Studies show that the clothes we wear affect our behavior, attitudes, personality, mood, confidence, and even the way we interact with others. In other words, the image you present to the world affects how you think and act. So, present a professional author image and you will gain confidence.

2. Stay in The Know.

Nothing builds confidence like knowledge. The more you know, the more secure you are in stepping into that knowledge. Staying up-to-date on publishing and marketing trends helps you act more confidently. Learn what others are doing successfully and then mimic these tactics with your target audience for successful exposure.

Join writers’ or publishers’ associations to receive cutting-edge information and join with others in group marketing efforts. Network with members of the organization to learn what is working for them and for collaborative opportunities. Right now, Christian Small Publishers Association (CSPA) is offering a summer membership special for small publishers and independent authors producing Christian books. For just $120 you can join CSPA through December 2019.

3. Show Your Passion.

As an author, you should be passionate about your book and the message it conveys. A passionate person displays confidence in the subject they are passionate about. Let your passion shine through as you communicate with people. Enthusiasm is catchy. As your fervor for your book shines, others will also catch your excitement and want to know more about your book and how their lives might benefit from your message.

Pursue and respond to opportunities to let your passion shine. Write guest blog posts and articles aimed at your target audience. Look for speaking opportunities to share your message.

Developing a professional, well-dressed image will build your confidence and help establish trust with your readers and other professionals you interact with as you market your books.

Related Posts:
Don’t Be Unprofessional
Do You Look Professional?
Is Fear Paralyzing You?

Don’t miss out on any of the great information shared in this blog. Subscribe to receive each post in your email box. Just click here.